News

„Identity“ in Globus

„Identity“ in Globus

An extensive review of Fukuyama’s book Identity. The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment was published in ...

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A Lecture by Peter Wagner

A Lecture by Peter Wagner

Last week, Peter Wagner, author of our newest book Progress: A Reconstruction gave a lecture on progress, democracy and ...

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Big Discounts in The House of Good Books

Big Discounts in The House of Good Books

Fans of a good book, since this year's book fair has been canceled, TIM press offers you a discount from 20 to 80%, and...

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Book of the month
The first scientist

Towards the publication of the book How to Find a Higgs Boson – And the Other Big Mysteries In the World of the Very Small by Dutch physicist Ivo van Vulpen, book of November is The First Scientist. Anaximander and His Legacy by a famous Italian physicist Carlo Rovelli.

Writing about Anaximander as the first scientist, Rovelli eloquently and complexly contemplates the nature of scientific thought. By engaging in a contemporary philosophical discussion of the nature of science, he sees a prominent feature of scientific thought in the awareness of our total ignorance and suspicion in existing knowledge as well as the constant re-examination of our cognitive mechanisms.
In a time in which signs of perfidious obscurantism are visible, Rovelli offers us a strong and passionate defense of the freedom of thought, and the book deals with great subjects – science and democracy, doubt as the basis of knowledge, controversy with cultural relativism, science and faith – Inspired by this extraordinary adventure of Anaximander’s critical thought.

You can buy this book via our webshop this month at a promotional price!

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Available soon
The Light that Failed

This famous book by two prominent intellectuals, Ivan Krastev and Stephen Holmes, completely reshapes our understanding of the crisis of liberalism and answers the question of why the West, after winning the Cold War, lost its political balance. In the early 1990s, the spread of liberal democracy to the East was expected. Yet the transformation of Eastern European countries has spawned a bitter rejection of liberalism itself, not only in the East but also in the heart of the West. The authors, however, believe that the end of the age of imitation does not mean that people will stop appreciating freedom and pluralism, that liberal democracy will disappear, or that reactionary authoritarianism and nativism will rule the world. This means a return, but not to the world conflict of two...

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